Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins recognizes service and retirement of Emergency Management Coordinator

 

Patrick McMacken stands with Chief Douglass Bass of the Dallas County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management as Judge Clay Jenkins reads the resolution thanking McMacken for his service.
Patrick McMacken stands with Chief Douglas Bass of the Dallas County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management as Judge Clay Jenkins reads the resolution thanking McMacken for his service.

Joseph Mancuso, PIO GIP Fellow

Patrick McMacken, Emergency Management Coordinator for the City of Irving, was formally recognized by the Dallas County Commissioners Court after he announced his retirement  following nearly 15 years of service to the City and the surrounding area.

McMacken, a qualified FEMA instructor, assisted with events such as Super Bowl 45 and helped to handle public shelter operations following Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Ike and Gustav.  He was also responsible for coordinating with emergency responders on a regular basis.

Judge Jenkins spoke of the value of teamwork and diligence exhibited by McMacken. “He is well respected among his colleagues, partners, elected officials and the public,” he said.

Commissioner John Wiley Price commemorates Juneteenth in Dallas County Commissioners Court

Commissioner Price notes the history and significance of Juneteenth in American culture.
Commissioner Price notes the history and significance of Juneteenth in American culture.

Joseph Mancuso, PIO GIP Fellow

Commissioner John Price, speaking for the Dallas County Commissioners Court, reflected upon and commemorated the history of the civil war and slavery on June 18, the day before the 148th ‘Juneteenth Independence Day.’

While the emancipation proclamation was issued by President Lincoln in 1863, freeing slaves in the United States, it wasn’t until June 19, 1865, that Union troops arrived in Galveston, Texas and announced the end of the war to the last of the Confederate forces, formally eradicating slavery from the United States. Former slaves in the Southwest celebrated the anniversary of their freedom, June 19, as ‘Juneteenth.’

“This court is in lockstep with the movement of the U.S. Congress, the Congressional Black Caucus and American of all genders, races and creeds who respect the integrity of our history as a nation,” Price said.