Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins honors work of organization assisting veterans

 

Veterans and members of the UA VIP program stand as Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins reads the resolution honoring the work of the UA VIP Program in assisting US military veterans and service members.
Veterans and members of the UA VIP program stand as Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins reads the resolution honoring the work of the UA VIP Program in assisting US military veterans and service members.

Joseph Mancuso, PIO GIP Fellow

Judge Jenkins recognized and honored in Dallas County Commissioners Court on June 25 the service of the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States, Canada and Australia.

The organization, commonly referred to as UA, assists military veterans through the Veterans in Piping program. This program aims to help reduce the high unemployment rate for US veterans by offering training for skilled labor positions to veterans and active duty military personnel and assisting them in finding career opportunities after completion of the training. The training is comprised of 18 weeks of courses and allows participants to earn industry-recognized certifications.

Jenkins praised the efforts of the UA program and the results it brings, saying the program ensures that veterans have the opportunity to “continue to be productive, working members of society.”

Commissioner John Wiley Price shares personal battle with Vitiligo and lauds efforts of support groups

 

Members of a delegation stand as Commissioner Price reads a resolution pertaining to Vitiligo, a disease that results in the depigmentation of the skin.
Members of a delegation stand as Commissioner Price reads a resolution pertaining to Vitiligo, a disease that results in the depigmentation of the skin.
Commissioner John Wiley Price reads a resolution recognizing the efforts of organizations in assisting those afflicted by vitiligo.
Commissioner John Wiley Price reads a resolution recognizing the efforts of organizations in assisting those afflicted by vitiligo.

Joseph Mancuso, PIO GIP Fellow

Commissioner Price, in Dallas County Commissioners Court on June 25, praised the efforts of the Dallas-Forth Worth Vitiligo Support Group and Vitiligo Support International in hosting the first annual Vitiligo Walk-a-Thon on June 22.

The Walk-a-Thon was held in Breckenridge Park in Richardson, Texas, and raised more than $4000 to combat Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease which results in the depigmentation  of the skin. More than 70 people participated in the event and the Vitiligo Support Group is still accepting donations to assist in their cause. There is no known cure for the disease, which affects nearly 3 million people in the United States.

When reading the resolution, Commissioner Price was noticeably affected and revealed that he was personally diagnosed with Vitiligo a few years ago. While he said he was greatly impacted by it, he is now in remission. Commissioner Price went on to say that “the psychological effects of Vitiligo on individuals are vast, with many feeling stigmatized by their condition.”

Dallas County Commissioner Theresa Daniel proclaims June to be LGBT Pride Month

 

 

Members of the delegation from the Dallas LGBT community stand as Commissioner Theresa Daniel reads the resolution proclaiming June 2013 to be LGBT Pride Month.
Members of the delegation from the Dallas LGBT community stand as Commissioner Theresa Daniel reads the resolution proclaiming June 2013 to be LGBT Pride Month.

Joseph Mancuso, PIO GIP Fellow

In a resolution passed June 18 and read by Commissioner Daniel, the Dallas County Commissioners Court declared June 2013 to be an official month of Pride for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

The Pride month is intended to commemorate the June 1969 Stonewall Riots, which sparked the liberation movement for the LGBT community. Dallas County is the only county in Texas to have enacted LGBT-friendly employee policies and health benefits, including a full-time liaison to in the Dallas County Sheriff’s Department and a employee non-discrimination policy.

Commissioner Daniel lauded the County for being inclusive and protecting the rights of all, saying “Dallas County’s LGBT community has the right to feel safe and not live with fear of harassment and persecution.” She added, “Tolerance and acceptance is something we must all practice and teach future generations.”